Road Trip! Classic and Brand New Car Games to Save Your Spring Break Drive

Travel Games for Kids

Whether you’re traveling near or far this spring break, these classic and soon-to-be-classic car travel games for kids are guaranteed for everyone to unplug and join in the family fun. Give them a try and let us know how it goes!

The License Plate Game
This should ring a bell… remember riding around, looking for an Alabama license plate, then one from Alaska? The License Plate Game is still a great way to pass the time in the car. Older kids can find every state – in alphabetic order, even – younger kids can find plates with the letters of the alphabet, in order.

Read My List!™ Game
Ready to think fast? What do a curling iron, grill, and a light bulb all have in common? If you said they are “things that are hot,” then you’re well on your way to becoming a listing legend! Great for anywhere, anytime fun, Read My List™, is a think-quick card game of categories and lists perfect for playing in the car. Listen to a list, remember what you heard, and win points for naming things missing from the list, identifying their category, or being the last player standing in a Lightning Round. With two game play levels – easy and hard – everyone can join in the fun.

Slug Bug
If your road trip is already turning rambunctious you might want to alter the rules of this car trip classic so that kids race to shout out or tap the center console when they spot a VW Bug on the road. Assign 2 points for classic Bugs and 1 for new models and play to 5.

Grandma’s Trunk™ Alphabet Game
Also available in card game format from EI with additional alphabet and memory games, classic Grandma’s Trunk is another fun one. Start by saying “I packed my Grandma’s trunk and in it I put a…” and add an item that starts with the letter A. The next player says the same thing, repeating your item and adding their own item beginning with the letter B. Continue play until you reach Z and see who can remember the entire contents of the trunk – in order!

Travel Blurt!®
Think quick! What do you call a large container of water for swimming? Blurt the answer first, and you’re on your way to winning this riotous game of rapid word recall. This handy, portable version of best-selling Blurt! , is perfect whether you’re driving or flying and great for keeping kids entertained on the go.

EI wishes you safe and happy travels this spring break!

At EI, we believe in sharing, and we bet you do, too, so please don’t forget to share this post with your friends!

Our Most Colorful Experiment Yet!

As we head into what is a long weekend for many of our readers, we wanted to share a very colorful activity that you can try at home. Think about some of the items you have in your refrigerator or in your pantry…do you know which items are acids? Which are bases? Why is this important?

Classifying chemicals as acids or bases helps chemists determine how the substances will react when mixed with other chemicals. This is very important when creating products that people use in their everyday lives such as medicine or cleaning supplies. Today, we’ll show you a fun and easy way to tell the difference between an acid and a base. You can try this at home, but don’t forget to grab an adult to help you before you start!

You’ll need:

  • Laboratory glasses*
  • 3 Beakers*
  • 1 Stirring rod*
  • 4 Test tubes with caps*
  • 2 Funnels*
  • Red cabbage (half a head)
  • Pot
  • Water (tap is fine)
  • Knife
  • Stirring spoon or spatula
  • Strainer
  • Lemon or lemon juice (2–3 tablespoons)
  • Baking Soda (2–3 tablespoons)

*Don’t have a chemistry set at home yet? Don’t worry—the Nancy B’s Science Club™ Stir-It-Up Chemistry Lab has you covered!

Here’s the step-by-step:

1. Chop the red cabbage into chunks, and boil in a pot of water for 15 minutes. Stir the cabbage as it boils.

2. Let your concoction cool, and then strain the cabbage juice into a beaker. Note the lovely purple color of the juice! This is your acid-base indicator. The purple color tells us that the liquid is “neutral”—exactly between an acid and a base.

3. Pour the acid-base indicator into three test tubes using one of your funnels. Fill each test tube about ⅓ full. This will leave space to add the item you will be testing.
4. Pour 2–3 tablespoons of lemon juice into a clean beaker. (Discard any seeds.)

5. Use the second funnel to pour the lemon juice into one of the test tubes with the cabbage juice. What happens? Check out the new beautiful color! The color changed because lemon juice is an acid.

6. Now, fill a clean beaker with tap water and dissolve 2–3 tablespoons of baking soda into it. Stir until the solution is well mixed.

7. Use a clean funnel to pour your baking soda solution into one of the test tubes with untouched cabbage juice. Now what happens? Are you seeing a different color? This color change happens because baking soda is a base.

What do you think happens when you combine an acid and a base? Try it yourself or watch the video to see Nancy’s colorful result!

Take It Further:
How does this colorful experiment work? Red cabbage contains a pigment called anthocyanin that changes color when mixed with an acid or a base. (When you see leaves change to a beautiful red color during the fall, you’re seeing anthocyanins at work!)

For extra fun, see what happens to your acid-base indicator when you mix it with other kitchen items: vinegar, milk, dishwashing liquid, liquid antacid, or orange juice. (Warning: don’t mix cleaning solutions.) Keep a chart and note the color change for each item you test. Remember that acids turn red and bases turn blue-green. Which items are acids and which are bases?

Please share your results with us at facebook.com/educationalinsights.

Happy experimenting!

Change It Up! Breast Cancer Research Foundation

James Tu supports Breast Cancer Research Foundation For the Month of March, James made it his goal to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation for EI’s Change It Up! initiative, where each month an employee chooses a worthy organization for which to fundraise and collect spare change. EI matches up to $100 in support of the effort.

BCRF is a nonprofit organization committed to achieving prevention and a cure for breast cancer. They provide critical funding for cancer research worldwide to fuel advances in tumor biology, genetics, prevention, treatment, metastasis, and survivorship.

“Breast Cancer affects so many people’s lives, said James. “Whether you’re a patient or a family member/friend supporting their battle, I think that all of us know someone whose life has been changed by breast cancer. I’m hoping that someday the impact of breast cancer will be non-existent.”

WHY “BCRF” WORKS
In 2014-2015, BCRF will award $47 million in annual grants to 222 scientists from top universities and medical institutions around the globe. In addition, $11.6 million has been committed to the international Founder’s Fund project focused on metastasis. Every hour of research, we fund improves outcomes and saves lives. But we still have more to do. The thousands of women and men suffering from breast cancer today depend on us. No institution can conquer this disease alone. Together, we can.

Please join James in support of BCRF and help breast cancer patients lead longer and more fulfilling lives. Visit: bcrfcure.org.

Hop to It! Three Sweet, Springtime Activities That Don’t Involve Sugar!

Spring into Easter with these sweet springtime activities for kids!

Get Crafty!
Bunny Mask Craft for KidsRelease your inner bunny with this adorable Easter mask! Simply print our Hoppy Floppy Bunny mask on heavy cardstock and cut out (don’t forget to cut holes for the eyes!). Punch holes on either side of the mask, thread an elastic string, and knot. Now personalize with embellishments like pipe cleaner whiskers and pompom cheeks and you’ve got the perfect Easter accessory!

Squeeze in Some Science!

Check out our very own Nancy B, of Nancy B’s Science Club™, perform her latest egg-cellent egg-speriment. Gather two raw eggs (use decorated eggs for an Easter spin), salt, and two clear drinking glasses. Now, let the magic of science begin!

Spot the Signs of Spring!
easterWork together to make a list of things that happen in the springtime. Green grass peeks out from below the frost, flowers begin to bloom, the sun stays out longer, baby animals are born, butterflies emerge from cocoons…you get the idea. Then take a walk and see how many signs you can spot in your own neighborhood. Added bonus – go home and draw what you saw! At EI, we believe in sharing, and we bet you do, too, so please don’t forget to share this post with your friends!

Remember to stop by our Facebook page to share your results.

Egg-citing Video Alert #2: The Floating Egg Experiment

Is it easier to float in an ocean or a freshwater lake? How do you make an egg float? It’s time to defy gravity (well, not really, but the results are still amazing), with Nancy B’s latest egg-cellent egg-speriment! Try this at home using items found right in your kitchen.

Here’s what you’ll need:
• 2 beakers (or clear drinking glasses)
• Water
• Salt (a good pour as opposed to a sprinkle)
• 2 raw eggs

The How-to:
1. Fill both glasses/beakers with tap water. Be sure to fill the water to the rim of the beaker or glass.
2. Carefully place one of the eggs into the glass/beaker. What happens?
3. Next, pour several heaping tablespoons of salt into the other beaker/glass and stir to dissolve the salt. Gently place the second egg into the salty water. Are the results any different?

This experiment shows us that objects float higher in salty ocean water than in freshwater.

Why does this happen? When the weight of the displaced water – the water that pours out of your beaker/glass when you drop in the egg – is LESS than that of the egg, then the egg will sink. Conversely, if the weight of the displaced water is MORE than the weight of the egg – as it is with very salty water – then the egg will float.
Ready for more egg-cellent fun? Here’s an egg-stension for you:

• In what other liquids might an egg float? Here’s a few to test:
• Cooking oil
• Vinegar
• Honey
• What do you think would happen if you drop a raw egg in the ocean or a saltwater lake?

Give it a try, and tell us the results!

Be sure to share what you find with us on Facebook.com/educationalinsights.

Happy Egg-sperimenting!